Skip to main content

Start Saving and Earn GOOD money With our WOBBLE-3 Series

WOBBLE-3 & WOBBLE-3-Plus

Superior but affordable Handheld Fiber Laser Welding Machine

Lasermach Handheld Wobble Fiber Laser Welding Machine is a new type high-power, high-end continuous welding tool which adopts a high-quality fiber laser source to produce a stirring fiber optic beam. After transmission processing, the light is focused on the workpiece to achieve continuous welding. It avoids the two thresholds of thermal strain and post-treatment, and is environmentally friendly and pollution-free, greatly improving the joint strength and quality of welding.
Replacing the previously fixed light path with a hand-held type with wobbling function, not only facilitates the welding of molds, advertising characters, kitchen utensils, doors and windows, etc., but also makes laser welding possible in outdoor operations.

The wobble method produces a superior weld by greatly reducing imperfections, increasing consistency, reducing material cost and providing more tolerance for process variables.

The traditional welding of electric welding, argon arc welding, etc. will soon be replaced by laser wobble welding.

Wobble welding technology allows to skip the filler material while achieving a high quality welding seam.

Wobble Head Welding - Seam Gap and Seam Offset

A factor of 2-3 increase in both process parameters can be achieved compared to conventional laser welding without Wobbling!

 

Seam Sealing Butt Weld with Loose tolerance

Bridge wide gaps with our Wobble-3

Larger Wobbling Spot Size helps bridging bigger gaps

The required tolerance for fit-up is reeduced

The lower tolerances needed reduce the machining costs

Non tolerance parts can still be used : less scrap, less losses = big savings

Maximum yield and quality of welded part

Dissimilar Metal Welding of Sheet Metal Components

Join Stainless steel with zinc coated steel without cracking, porosity or blowholes!

The ability to create products using different metals and alloys greatly increases both design and production flexibility. Optimizing properties such as corrosion, wear and heat resistance of the finished product while managing its cost, is a common motivation for dissimilar metal welding.

Joining stainless steel and zinc coated (galvanized) steel is a one example. Because of their excellent corrosion resistance, both 304 stainless steel and zinc coated carbon steel have found widespread use in applications as diverse as kitchen appliances and aeronautical components.

The process presents some special challenges, particularly since the zinc coating can present serious problems with weld porosity. During the welding process, the energy that melts steel and stainless steel will vaporize the zinc at approximately 900⁰C, which is significantly lower than the melting point of the stainless steel.

The low boiling (vaporization) point of zinc causes a vapor to form during the keyhole welding process. In seeking to escape the molten metal, the zinc vapor may become trapped in the solidifying weld pool resulting in excessive weld porosity. In some cases, the zinc vapor will escape as the metal is solidifying creating blowholes or roughness of the weld surface.

With proper joint design and selection of laser process parameters, cosmetic and mechanically sound welds are readily produced. As shown below, the top and bottom surfaces of an overlap weld of 0.6 mm thick 304 stainless steel and 0.5 mm thick zinc coated steel exhibit no cracking, porosity, or blowholes.

  • left : Bottom bead (back side) of lap weld of 304 stainless steel and zinc coated steel. Shown is the zinc coated steel surface.
  • right: Top bead of lap weld of 304 stainless steel and zinc coated steel. Shown is the stainless steel surface.

Dissimilar Metal Welding - Different metals perfect joining by Fiber laser

As with any welding process, establishing a good fiber laser weld involves a lot of variables.

A material’s weldability is a factor. Most common materials a fab shop will process—be it carbon steel, stainless, or aluminum—have been successfully laser welded for years, using both continuous wave and pulsed modes. Lasers have performed dissimilar-metal welding ( Sample picture is copper joined with stainless steel by fiber laser welder), and specialized weld joint designs in galvanized material have even accounted for zinc outgassing. Moreover, a multikilowatt fiber laser has been shown to successfully weld even the most challenging of materials, including copper